LaRue Reading Skills Assessment

LaRue Reading Skills Assessment for Preliterate Students (LaRue Reading Assessment)

Narrative Summary: 

The LaRue Reading Assessment was developed to test students who have very limited English literacy skills and cannot read and write in their own language. The test will help you determine the prereading skills that should be taught next and whether a preliterate student has all of the literacy skills needed to join a mainstream ESL class.

Intended Population: 

The LaRue Reading Assessment is intended for preliterate students with limited English literacy skills who cannot read or write in their own language. (This test is not appropriate for students who have attended school and learned to read and write in any language.)

Purpose: 

The LaRue Reading Assessment measures levels of achievement for preliterate students. It can be used to help make decisions about when preliterate students are ready to join a mainstream ESL class.

Skills Measured-Test Content: 

The Larue Reading Assessment combines an oral interview by the instructor and reading and writing by the student. It tests the student’s knowledge of sounds and phonics, as well as other literacy skills. It reveals what skills a student does and does not have.

Range of Skill Levels: 

Preliteracy to lowest level of literacy skills in English

Number of Items per Test: 

Twenty-four items per form (five items in section 1, five items in section 2, six items in section 3, and eight items in section 4)

Types of Items: 
  • Section 1: This section tests a student’s ability to recognize and correctly name the letters of the alphabet. It also tests his or her knowledge of alphabetical order.
  • Section 2: This section tests a student’s ability to recognize and correctly name numbers. It also tests his or her knowledge of numerical order.
  • Section 3: This section tests a student’s knowledge of the sounds of beginning and ending consonants and short vowels. It also tests his or her knowledge of sight words.
  • Section 4: This section tests a student’s ability to copy and write letters, organize items in alphabetical order, and write words and sentences from dictation. It also tests his or her ability to put today’s date in written form.
Development of Items: 

Items were chosen that are part of the basic reading curriculum.

Size of Item Bank: 

Seventy-two items (3 forms, each with 24 items)

Subtests: 

Four separately scored sections on each form (see Types of Items)

Alternate Test Forms: 

Three versions: Forms A, B, and C

Required / Recommended Administrator Training: 

Test administrators will need a minimum of practice giving the assessment.

Test Administration Procedures: 

This test is given as a one-to-one interview with the student. The student may point to the correct answer, say the correct answer aloud, or write the correct answer on the test page, as appropriate. Administrators may repeat each question or statement only once. If the student does not understand, he or she should move to the next question. The questions are ordered in increasing difficulty within each section. If a student cannot answer the first two questions in each section, the administrator should not ask the remaining questions in that section. In that situation, the administrator should move on to the next section to find out if the student is more proficient in another area.

Scoring - How: 

The test includes four sections. Each section score has a separate subtotal. A Scoring Guide is available for help in interpreting the scores.

Scoring - Type: 
  • Section 1: A score from 0 to 23 is possible. If the examinee scores less than 23, then he or she needs to learn to recognize and identify the letters and how to put them in alphabetical order.
  • Section 2: A score from 0 to 23 is possible. If the examinee scores less than 23, then he or she needs to practice naming the numbers and putting them in numerical order.
  • Section 3: A score from 0 to 24 is possible. If the examinee scores less than 24, then he or she needs to learn the connection between letters and sounds and practice phonics skills. In addition, he or she needs to learn to read basic sight words.
  • Section 4: A score from 0 to 30 is possible. If the examinee scores less than 30, then he or she needs to practice the writing skills tested in this section.
  • Overall: o A score of 90 points or more is strong evidence that the examinee has basic literacy skills and will be able to take the CASAS test 11 or 12. o A score of 90 points or more also indicates that the examinee is ready to join a mainstream ESL class, although his or her progress may still be slower than other mainstream students because he or she will not be able to call on prior knowledge of native language literacy.
Scoring - Who: 

Test administrator

Scoring - How Long: 

Scoring occurs while the test is being administered.

Reporting Procedures: 

N/A

Time Needed for Assessment: 

Ten to 20 minutes

Publisher / Company / Source: 

Charles LaRue
Multicultural Ed Services
763–767–7786

Versions & Publication Dates: 

Three versions: Forms A, B, and C

Cost: 

Available free in PDF form from http://www.mced...

Additional Comments: 

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